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Glossary of Wire & Cable

Wire & Cable Abbreviations
S = service
J = Junior
O = Oil Resistant
T = Thermoplastic/Vinyl
W-A = Weather Approved
P = Parallel
E = Elastomer

SEOW
Extra hard service cord. Thermoplastic elastomer, oil resistant (TPE) construction jacket. 600 volt, weather resistant for outdoor use.

SJEW
Hard service Thermoplastic or rubber-insulated conductors and overall Thermoplastic jacket. All elastomer construction. 300V, 90°C to 105°C. Weather resistant.

SJEOW
Hard service Thermoplastic or rubber-insulated conductors and oil resistant overall Thermoplastic jacket. All elastomer construction. 300V, 90°C to 105°C. Weather resistant.

SEW
Extra hard service cord TPE jacketed all Thermoplastic Elastomer (TPE) construction. 600V, 90°C to 105°C. Weather resistant for outdoor use.

STW
Extra hard service cord. Thermoplastic constructed jacket. 600 volt, weather resistant for outdoor use.

SJTW
Hard service cord. Thermoplastic constructed jacket. 300 volt, weather resistant for outdoor use.

SPT-1
Thermoplastic constructed cord, parallel jacketed, 300 volt, 2 or 3 conductor, 18 gauge.

SPT-2
Same as SPT-1 except heavier construction. 18-16 gauge.

SPT-3
Same as SPT-2 except heavier construction. 18-10 gauge.

SRDT
Range and dryer cord, 3 conductor parallel or 4 conductors insulated thermoplastic construction.

SVT
Vacuum cleaner service cord. All plastic construction, 2 or 3 conductor.

TPE
Abbreviation for thermoplastic elastomer compound used in Arctic/Tropic (SJEOW) and Frigid-Flex (SJEW) cords.

 

AWG
American Wire Gauge. A relative system for the designation of diameter.

Alternating Current (AC)
Or line voltage-U.S. household standard current is 110/120 volts, 60 cycle.

AMP Load
Total amount of amperage flowing through a conductor (wire) when it is loaded.

Bell Wire
Vinyl covered copper wire, normally 18 gauge, used for low voltage wiring, i.e.: doorbell, chimes, etc.

Centigrade
Metric temperature scale, where water freezes at 0° (compared to 32° Fahrenheit), and boils at 100° (compared to 212°F).

Circuit
The path that electricity flows through a conductor.

Compound
Insulation or jacketing material of two or more ingredients.

Conductor
Material (wire) that is capable of transporting an electrical charge easily. Cords can be two points or a single wire or individual wires in a cable.

Continuity Test
Determines whether an electrical path exists between two points of a single wire or individual wires in a cable.

Cord
An insulated wire (conductor) for conveying current.

Current
The flow of electricity through a conductor measured in amperes.

Direct Current (DC)
An electrical current that flows in one direction. Batteries are an example of DC current production.

Decibel (db)
A unit of power output (acoustical or electrical), for example, power gain in amplifiers or power loss in cables.

Diode
An electrical component that passes current in one direction and blocks it in the other direction.

Fahrenheit
English temperature scale, where water freezes at 32° (compared to 0 Centigrade), and boils at 212° (compared to 100°C).

Gauge
Term used to denote physical size of wire.

Ground
Electrical term referring to connecting to the earth or large conducting body to serve as earth.

Hot Conductor
Pertains to any ungrounded conductor, or energized wire.

 

 

HPN
Parallel Heater Cord, typically Neoprene insulated two conductor.

Insulation
Non-conductive material that surrounds or separates two conductive materials (wire).

Milliamp
One thousand (.001) of amp.

NEMA
National Electrical Manufacturers.

OSHA
Occupational Safety and Health Act. Specifically the Williams-Steiger law passed in 1970 covering all factors relating to safety in places of employment.

Polarity
Condition by which the direction of current flow can be determined in an electrical circuit.

Polarized Plug
A plug constructed to allow insertion into a receptacle only one way because one blade is wider than the other.

Primary Wire
Intended for low voltage applications, usually less then 50 volts. Used mainly in autos/trucks or battery operated equipment.

PVC
Polyvinyl Chloride. Compound used in thermoplastic (SJTW, STW) cords.

Rated Voltage
Maximum voltage at which an electrical component can be operated for extended periods without causing a safety hazard or undue degradation.

Resistance
A substance that impedes the flow of current resulting in loss of power, such as heat.

Sheath
Outer jacket or covering of multi-conductor cable.

Stranded Conductor
A wire conductor comprised of a group of twisted or braided strands of wire, providing flexibility a single strand of wire of the same gauge cannot.

Thermoplastic
Plastic material that softens when heated and firms when cooled. Examples are Poly Vinyl Chloride and Polyethylene.

UL
Underwriters Laboratories, an independent, non-profit organization that operates a listing service for electrical/electronic materials/ equipment.

Volt
Unit to measure electromotive force.

Watt
Unit of electrical power defined as one amp of current driven by one volt of electromotive
force.

 

 

 

 

U.S. Wire & Cable Corporation | One Flexon Plaza | Newark, NJ 07114
Tel: 973.824.5529 | Fax: 973.824.1208 | 800.327.4673